Bullet Points and a Brew 4/5/17

Hot and a chance of tornadoes.

That’s the weather in Chattanooga today, so it’ safe to say we’re working our way deeper into spring. As spring arrives, so does a renewed focus in Jiu Jitsu and sport climbing. I’ve got a match with a competitor from Knoxville in a week and a half, so I’m trying to develop some conditioning and sharpen up my game to put on a good showing April 15th. I’m excited to get back on the mat again!

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I made sure to look as intimidating as possible

I’m also starting to work to develop some endurance for route climbing. I’ve set up my plan, so now it’s time to go to work. I recently finished reading Logical Progression by Steve Bechtel. It’s chock full of ideas to structure your training, and I’m playing with a few. I’m looking forward to seeing how it goes.

Let’s get into the Bullet Points.

The Bullet Points

Feast your ears on the first “Board Meeting” Power Company Climbing podcast featuring all four members of the team. In the episode, we talk about where we get our sources of information. The Board Meeting episodes are a bit more laid back, so expect some solid information paired with some laughter.

Will Anglin is the head climbing coach for Earth Treks in Golden Colorado. He’s full of intelligent training ideas and ponderances. This article introduces rules that you should follow if you want to be a better climber. A concise and fantastic article.

Many individuals live in a state of extension in their lower backs. At worst, it can lead to pain and spinal injury. Oftentimes, it’s just mild discomfort. However, lacking the ability to control spinal position is a problem. Here’s an an avenue to address it.

Too often, it’s easy to jump into a certain corrective exercise or mobility drill to address joint funkiness. Maybe, the cure is just to step back and evaluate technique. This article addresses the bench press and some technical points, and includes some GOLD pressing variations at the end of the article. Like the majority of Tony’s work, it’s full of actionable information while being an enjoyable read.

The Brew

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Rum Barrel Aged Siberian Black Magic Panther, Westbrook Brewing Co.

Disclaimer: I had a cold and couldn’t taste much when I cracked this open. Of course, I didn’t have this realization until right after I opened it, but o well.

This beer is a big, boozy stout from Westbrook. It poured black with a dark chocolate colored head and a boozy aroma filled the room almost immediately. It had a strong aroma of Rum with some sweetness. The flavor was full of roasty and bitter malts, some candi sugar sweetness, maybe some vanilla and caramel flavors, and rum pronounced throughout. Super boozy. It’s not a surprise this is a 12% abv beer. A big, burly beer that is aggressive. It was good, but a bit too in-your-face and not quite balanced enough for me.

That’s it for this week.


What’s Happening

kettlebell-course-chattanooga-tn

Strongfirst Kettlebell User Course

I’m excited to announce that the Strongfirst Kettlebell User course is coming back to Chattanooga! On May 27, Senior SFG Delaine Ross will be at Scenic City Strength and Fitness for an 8 hour workshop breaking down fundamental kettlebell skills. These skills lay the foundation for a lifetime of effective kettlebell training, so this course is not to be missed. You can find more information here.

Coaching

I deliver efficient and effective programming that gets the job done without demanding too much of your valuable time. I have one open spot for distance coaching, so if you are interested, please reach out ASAP. You can find more information here.

Mailing List

I’m playing around with a newsletter. It will contain article alerts, special content promotions, and offers exclusive to subscribers. You can sign up here if you’d like. It’s completely free.

I’m teaching two kettlebell classes at Scenic City Strength and Fitness.

An entry-level class that emphasizes the foundations of safe and effective kettlebell training is held Tuesdays at 6:15 pm. It’s only 10 bucks and spots will be limited to ensure a great experience. If you are in the Chattanooga area and have always been curious about trying out kettlebells, it’ll be tough to find a better opportunity.

I also teach a class for folks who are more familiar with kettlebells on Thursdays at the same time. We will dive into some more advanced kettlebell movements and concepts, and push the intensity up a bit more than Tuesday.

You can check out the calendar and register online for any of these classes here. Each class is 10$. Hurry, because the spots fill up fast.

Social Medias

Like what you’ve read? Want to find out more? Like the Facebook Page and share with your friends!

Bullet Points and a Brew 3/23/17

It’s that time of year. It seems as though the cold days and winter friction are leaving us, so sessions on boulders such as the one above might be in danger of getting pushed back to next season, at least here in the south. It’s all good though! It’s time to put on a rope, realize my endurance sucks, and work on improving it. It’s also time to dig back into Jiu-Jitsu and continue that journey of improvement as well.

Let’s get into the bullet points.

The Bullet Points

Earlier this week, I published a piece that hopefully will the start of a series. Scientific journals are incredible informative, but synthesizing that usable information can be a pain. I try to do some of the work and break articles down into actual english in this new series. The inaugural article examines a study exploring cardiovascular fitness and blood flow characteristics in the forearm, and relates these two factors to sport climbing performance. Check it out.

Eric pops these out on a regular basis, and they’re always gold. This edition contains thoughts on video analysis, assessment, and ways to progress anterior core stability drills.

Mark Seigrist shared this article in a few groups I’m a part of (thanks Mark!) and it’s incredible! This interview opens a window into the mind of an individual who was one of the first to train specifically for climbing, put up an insane amount of hard climbs, and undoubtedly responsible for some of the directions the evolution of climbing has taken. A must read if you rock climb.

“Maybe lifting all the weight possible like a weightlifter is not the end-all-be-all to being a top athlete”

I’m all about lifting weights and getting stronger. However, I don’t have any illusions that that’s the most important aspect of performance training, especially in skill-based sports. Strength training has its place, but training like a powerlifter or olympic weightlifter doesn’t necessarily mean that performance in a given sport will increase. It’s up to the coach to figure out a way to make training “measurable” and continue to improve that metric. Some good thoughts from some smart people.

….I’m still gonna keep picking up heavy shit, though. You can do both.

The Brew

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Blueberry Weisse Weisse Baby, Westbrook Brewing Co.

Westbrook’s Weisse Weisse Baby is a Berlinerweisse style beer. These beers are light, slightly tart and super refreshing. The folks at Westbrook took the base beer and aged it in wine barrels with blueberries. It pours a crazy purplish color with a thin white head. The tartness is definitely present, with a wine-grape like character. The blueberry flavor slides in during the back half of the taste, and is nice and mellow. While fruity, there’s still a dryness to the overall taste and the fizziness makes it really refreshing. I probably should have waited to crack it open during one of the 100 degree days of summer, but oh well. It’s a great beer.

 

 


What’s Happening

kettlebell-course-chattanooga-tn

Strongfirst Kettlebell User Course

I’m excited to announce that the Strongfirst Kettlebell User course is coming back to Chattanooga! On May 27, Senior SFG Delaine Ross will be at Scenic City Strength and Fitness for an 8 hour workshop breaking down fundamental kettlebell skills. These skills lay the foundation for a lifetime of effective kettlebell training, so this course is not to be missed. You can find more information here.

 

Coaching

Nobody wants to waste time in the gym when they could be outside or developing the specific skills for their passion. I deliver efficient and effective programming that gets the job done without demanding too much of your valuable time. I have two open spots for distance coaching, so if you are interested, please reach out ASAP. These spots will fill up. You can find more information here.

Mailing List

I’m playing around with a newsletter. It will contain article alerts, special content promotions, and offers exclusive to subscribers. You can sign up here if you’d like. It’s completely free.

I’m teaching two kettlebell classes at Scenic City Strength and Fitness.

An entry-level class that emphasizes the foundations of safe and effective kettlebell training is held Tuesdays at 6:15 pm. It’s only 10 bucks and spots will be limited to ensure a great experience. If you are in the Chattanooga area and have always been curious about trying out kettlebells, it’ll be tough to find a better opportunity.

I also teach a class for folks who are more familiar with kettlebells on Thursdays at the same time. We will dive into some more advanced kettlebell movements and concepts, and push the intensity up a bit more than Tuesday.

You can check out the calendar and register online for any of these classes here. Each class is 10$. Hurry, because the spots fill up fast.

Social Medias

Like what you’ve read? Want to find out more? Like the Facebook Page and share with your friends!

 

The Readiness Manifesto

Note: This was originally intended to be a short piece. A few conversations that occurred throughout the period I worked on this coupled with the writing process that usually raises more questions than the original motivator morphed this article into one of the longest pieces of writing I’ve done. It details a large part of my training philosophy. 

If you needed to do something physically strenuous, right now, with no warmup, could you do it? Would you tweak something? Or are you ready to get after it?

I think it’s one of the most underrated qualities we can address in our training. There’s a lot of writing, research, and social media content about the “perfect warmup”. What happens if your training lays a lasting foundation that minimizes the need for an extensive warmup? Before you get all up in arms, please realize that I’m saying “minimize,” not eliminate.

3 separate, yet related aspects of physical conditioning need to be addressed to build a body that’s resilient to injury and ready to go at a moment’s notice. Our resiliency can be considered a bank account of sorts.  Everyday life, training, and performance situations all can be considered “withdrawals” from this bank account. What happens when we overdraw?

We get injured.

If we follow this logic, we need to make our bank account bigger by addressing Accessible Range of Motion, The Level of our Strength Skill, and our Conditioning.

Accessible Range of Motion

“If it’s important, do it every day”-Dan Gable

Adequate mobility is an absolute necessity for resiliency and readiness. Notice I didn’t say suberb mobility, but enough to get done what you need to get done. Vigilant mobility practice means daily mobility practice.

One of my favorite mobility drills is the Brettzel. It addresses multiple qualities including proper breathing, hip mobility and thoracic spine mobility. Thoracic spine mobility has a direct effect on our shoulder mobility. Structurally, the hips and shoulders allow greater mobility than any joint in our body, so it’s important to spend some time priming that mobility and developing the ability to control the movement of those two joints. This is a way to get that done.

I’ve been teaching this movement for a while now, but I recently learned a progression into the full Brettzel that I really like. It’s patient, and allows the individual to stop at the point that’s most beneficial to them. If we have to grit our teeth and force ourselves into a position, positive change is impossible due to the stress of holding that position.

The Brettzel Progression:

  1. Lay on your stomach, with your head on your hands. Inhale into your belly fully, and continue to inflate your chest. Relax and exhale fully. This is called crocodile breathing. Your goal should be expanding in a 360 degree area around your midsection. No chest breathing without expanding throughout the midsection as well.
  2.  Bring a leg up with the knee bent 90 degrees-ish to the side. The knee needs to be above the hip, for reasons I will address later. There will be space between that same side hip and the ground. Continue crocodile breathing and make that space smaller on every exhale. If you start holding your breath or straining, you are pushing into it too hard. Back off and relax into your stretch
  3. After a few breaths, bend the straight leg back from the knee. Reach back with the opposite arm and grab that foot. Continue crocodile breathing. On the exhale, gently pull that leg up and flex that glute. You should feel a stretch in the front of that hip. If you feel it in your back, stop. Concentrate on extending through your hip. Let the leg drop back down on the inhale. Repeat for 3-5 breaths (or more).
  4. Straighten your opposite arm, roll onto the side of your straight leg and use that arm to grab your knee. This is where the “knee above the hip” concept is important. If it drops below the hip, you will encourage movement through the lumbar spine. That’s bad. Don’t do that. We want to move through the thoracic spine only, so keep that knee above the hip.
  5. As you breath (still in the belly) relax into greater rotation on the exhale. Rotate through your upper back, and through the leg where you are grabbing the foot. Never force it. After 5-8  (or more) breaths, slowly release the tension to get out of the stretch. Don’t just let go.

At ANY point you feel a cramp, have to hold your breath, or feel you’re trying too hard, that’s your stopping point for the day. That’s where you need to spend some time (hint: probably more than one session) developing some mobility there. Be patient and work the process.

Here’s a video of the progression

 

An individual’s range of motion varies from person to person. Every movement, especially movements under an outside load have a cost. If said movement stays within our baseline range of motion, the cost of that movement is negligible. If we go outside of that accessible range, the cost starts to make an impact on our bank account. The bigger our baseline range of motion, the chance of that happening shrinks.

Strength Skill Level

High skill strength practice requires a few elements to be present. 1.) Multijoint movements 2.) A substantial external load to these movements 3.) The necessity for focus.

I don’t consider a bicep curl to be strength practice. Sure, you might increase the biceps ability to generate tension via nervous system adaptations or increasing the number of fibers in the muscle, but movement through just one joint has very little relation to the activities we do every day. We seldom interact with our outside environment via the movement of a single joint.

A lightly loaded or unloaded multijoint movement doesn’t qualify as strength practice in my mind either. For strength practice to increase our resiliency, the external load needs to encourage a high level of tension generated via the muscular and nervous system. As we increase our ability to generate high levels of tension, what used to be hard becomes easy. We need to use high amounts of tension less frequently as we go throughout our day.

Motor Control is often overlooked in the quest to build strength. This involves the demonstration of strength coupled with timing and coordination. Again, frequent practice helps develop this quality. In a controlled training setting, we have the opportunity to mindfully practice coordination, timing, and fluid movement.

What’s a movement that involves multiple joints, external load, and the necessity for mindful movement? The Turkish Get Up is an unparalleled example of a movement requiring all of these components.

 

Addressing the components of multijoint movement, training under external load, and focused practice develop our skill of demonstrating strength. As we improve this skill, the demands of everyday life stop encroaching upon this threshold. The further away from that threshold an outside demand resides,  the smaller our withdrawal from our resiliency bank account will be.

Conditioning

Our body has 3 basic energy systems. Aerobic, Lactic/Glycolytic, and Alactic. Although all three work together, the needs of each individual situation dictate which system is utilized the most.

Our alactic energy system is responsible for short duration, explosive activities. A short boulder problem, exploding into a double leg takedown or throw (pick your favorite japanese throw name, judo folks) in a jiu-jitsu competition, or a short set of kettlebell swings or snatches are all examples of utilizing this system.

Our lactic or glycolytic system is where we “feel the burn”. A 400 meter sprint, enduro-route at the Red ( or any route over 50 feet for me, at this point in time), or the third overtime in the EBI finals in jiu-jitsu would all be heavily drawing from this system.

The last, and often overlooked system in terms of training is our aerobic system. Resting, recovery, “refilling the tank” and longer duration, low intensity work draw from this system. Hanging off of a jug and recovering on a route, holding someone in guard and recovering in a jiu-jitsu match, or resting between attempts on a boulder problem should all be windows where the aerobic system can do its job.

Ideally, from a longevity standpoint, it’s a good idea to expand the Alactic and Aerobic energy systems and not spend a whole lot of time in the Glyocolytic arena. It’s an incredibly stressful system for the body. A simple way to develop the “bookends” of our energy system is sets of swings on the minute.

For example: Do a set of 10 explosive, crisp kettlebell swings, and rest the remainder of the minute. 10-20 minutes of this will make up a great training session, and shouldn’t leave you too destroyed, if you selected the proper weight.

Throughout life, performance, and training, we rely on our energy systems to give us the fuel to go about our activities. If the respective system is not robust enough for the demands of a given situation, the cost to our resiliency bank account increases.

Which Category Do I Need To Address First?

It’s important to realize the concept of a limiting factor. Let’s invoke the all-knowing wikipedia:

“Limiting Factor- an input or variable in such that a small change in it from present value would cause a non-negligible change in an output or other measure of system”

Time is a non-replenishing resource. We don’t get it back. Therefore, it’s ideal to find how to make the most effective change with the least amount of time and effort involved. If one method makes a given amount of improvement in 2 days, while a separate method makes the same amount of improvement in 2 weeks, it’s a clear choice that the first method is the ideal method.

Here’s where we need to set our ego to the side. Sometimes, you may not be the best person to find your limiting factor. If you aren’t sure where you need to spend your time, you need to see someone who can tell you. This could be via a Functional Movement Screen, a Physical Therapist, a knowledgeable coach, a Muscle Activation Techniques specialist, a Chiropractor, etc. There are an insane amount of ways you could go about this. So many disciplines boil down to the same basic principles, so find one that works for you.

Our perception is subjective, and ideally, an objective system to find the limiting factor will provide more accurate results. Everyone is different, and to be honest, everything works. What matters is that you find a way to step outside of your own judgement, and objectively discover where you could make the most improvement in the smallest amount of time.

So take a step back and ponder this question: Could you get up and get after it right now with little prep? It might be time to put in the work so you can.

 


Looking for guidance concerning your limiting factor? I’ve got a few spots open for distance coaching, and offer in-person coaching if you’re in the area. Learn more here.

 

Bullet Points and a Brew 2/13/17

Yeah, yeah, I missed last week. It wasn’t intentional, but I just never got around to it. All my fault, and here’s to more consistency starting NOW!!! (until I get inevitably get sidetracked in the near future one week.) It’s been a great couple of weeks. First, I had the opportunity to assist at a StrongFirst Level 1 Kettlebell Instructor certification. In addition to having the honor of helping some amazing people through the transformative weekend that is the SFG certification, I also was able to refine my coaching skills, pick up new info nuggets for use in the future, reconnect with old friends, and meet some incredible people. It would be an understatement to say I’m still fired up from the weekend, even 2 weeks after the fact.

Image Above: The entire Atlanta SFG Crew! Candidates and Amazing Coaches. I was lucky to be a part of it. Photo:Craig Marker

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StrongFirst Leadership, Team Leaders, and Assistant Instructors. A Group of Incredibly Knowledgeable and Strong People…and myself!
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Team Shlosser! I had the honor of working closely and learning from this group throughout the weekend. Photo: Craig Marker

I was also able to sneak in a trip to San Francisco to visit my brother. No climbing or training, but some great beer and a great time out in the Bay Area. I’m back in town and dialing in some coaching, some training, and some climbing (if it ever cools back down again and stops raining).

San Francisco, it's been real. Golden Gate Bridge hiding in the background.

A post shared by Paul Corsaro (@paulcorsaro) on

Let’s get into the bullet points.

The Bullet Points

I sat down with Kris Hampton of Power Company Climbing back around Christmas to discuss movement quality. I don’t think there is a case of “perfect form” for everybody. Individual differences matter. Correct form for a certain individual may not apply to the next person; however, I do believe there are some common principles for certain movements. We dig into some of those principles on the podcast.

Who has tight hips? Everybody, right? Well…maybe. Everyone enjoys stretching their hip flexors, or at least attempting to with horror shows such as this.

hip-flexor-stretches

Anyways, Dean Somerset explores some hip mobility concepts in this article. I share a lot of his stuff, and that’s OK, because it’s good stuff. Check it out.

Why do you exercise? Is it to supplement an active lifestyle? Or is it to replace activity in your lifestyle? That distinction is important. Gray Cook explores this dilemma, and also includes a video of some old dudes climbing at an age I hope I’m continuing to climb as well. Insightful, slightly philosophical, and straight up awesome, this article is a must read.

It’s often overlooked, but the Serratus Anterior is a crucial muscle contributing to shoulder health. Willow gives a brief intro into some of the functions of the muscle, and provides a couple interesting progressions to play with.

The Brew

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Frootwood, Founders Brewing Company

So, Founders is releasing a line of new barrel aged beers this year. Yeah, it’s pretty awesome. This is the first one that’s come down the line, or at least the first one I’ve seen. It’s a cherry ale aged in bourbon barrels. Very interesting indeed. It pours reddish with a hint of brown with an  off-white bubbly head. A cherry-forward aroma rises out of the glass, subtly influenced by bourbon. It’s a really interesting flavor with a lot of cherry, but the bourbon mellows it out, so you get a strong cherry-flavored beer without it tasting too sweet or like cough medicine. A nice bourbon aftertaste lingers. I really enjoyed this one. Haven’t really had a beer quite like it. If you see it, grab a bottle or two. It gets my seal of approval..like these:

This place gets my seal of approval.

A post shared by Paul Corsaro (@paulcorsaro) on

That’s it for this week. See y’all next week.


What’s Happening

Tactical Strength Challenge

We are hosting the Tactical Strength Challenge again at Scenic City Strength and Fitness! It will be held April 8th all around the world. The three skills tested are a max powerlifting-style deadlift, strict pull-ups or flexed arm hangs depending on your division, and a 5 minute snatch test. It’s an awesome event and a lot of fun to push your limits and cheer on everyone else. If you’re interested, reach out to me ASAP so we can answer your questions and get your registered! You can register here.

Nutrition, Performance, and Strength Coaching

If you’re interested in coaching, I can help. I offer strength training, Functional Movement Screen consulting, performance training, or some combination of these programs. You can find more information here.

Mailing List

I’m playing around with a newsletter. It will contain article alerts, special content promotions, and offers exclusive to subscribers. You can sign up here if you’d like. It’s completely free.

I’m teaching two kettlebell classes at Scenic City Strength and Fitness.

An entry-level class that emphasizes the foundations of safe and effective kettlebell training is held Tuesdays at 6:15 pm. It’s only 10 bucks and spots will be limited to ensure a great experience. If you are in the Chattanooga area and have always been curious about trying out kettlebells, it’ll be tough to find a better opportunity.

I also teach a class for folks who are more familiar with kettlebells on Thursdays at the same time. We will dive into some more advanced kettlebell movements and concepts, and push the intensity up a bit more than Tuesday.

You can check out the calendar and register online for any of these classes here. Each class is 10$. Hurry, because the spots fill up fast.

Bullet Points and a Brew 1/24/17

It’s another week of getting after it! I’m a week or so deep into a finger strength and strength training program, playing with ways to optimize how a session flows. I’m really happy with how things are going.

 

I head down to Atlanta on Thursday. I have the opportunity to be an assistant instructor at a StrongFirst kettlebell certification. I’m excited to see some old friends, make some new ones, and welcome newly-minted SFG instructors. Selfishly, I will get to witness some amazing coaches instruct and I can’t wait to learn from them. It’s gonna be a great weekend.

Let’s get into the bullet points

The Bullet Points

Foam rolling can be a waste of time. It can also be a huge help with improving mobility and movement quality. Which effect will it have on you? That depends on whether you do shit correctly. Dr. Rusin breaks down some of his favorite foam rolling drills. I stumbled across some new variations that I have implemented and immediately felt a benefit. There’s a lot of useful information in this article, so you should read it.

I was lucky to meet Chris at a PlanStrong event this past summer. He just posted the first article of a TEN part series exploring the Turkish Get Up. It’s something you should definitely follow. The Turkish Get Up can be a complex, intimidating movement. When someone owns a Get Up of 100+ pounds, you should probably hear what they have to say. Check it out, and follow along for what I’m sure will be a fantastic package of information.

I thought this was an interesting discussion. People have done some weird things to get better at a sport they love. Enjoy a thread filled with humorous answers, shenanigans, and an interesting idea here or there.

The Brew

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So Happens It’s Tuesday, The Bruery

The Bruery has a famous “Day of the week” lineup of big, boozy stouts that include Black Tuesday, Mocha Wednesday, Peanut Butter and Thursday, etc. So Happens It’s Tuesday is a rarely seen part of that line-up. Why? Rumor has it that this variant was victim of a large scale infection during the brewing process, probably with lactobacillus, a bacteria used to sour beers. Hence the name. SHappens I‘ts Tuesday. S.H.I.T. Get it? Anyways, I stumbled across a bottle a while ago and decided to crack it this past week. Yep. Mine was infected. However, it was still pretty damn good! The beer had plenty of the roasted malt character you’d expect from a stout, with a nice sour bite from the lactobacillus. The tartness didn’t overwhelm the stout characteristics, but blended with them quite nicely. Also, there was no hint of booziness from a beer with a reported 13+% alcohol content, another nice cover-up due to the tartness. I wouldn’t drink it everyday, but it goes to show that “infected” beers might still be tasty.


What’s Happening

Nutrition, Performance, and Strength Coaching

It’s the new year, and a lot of people are building out their strategy for training in 2017. I can help. If you’re interested in nutrition coaching, strength training, Functional Movement Screen consulting, performance training, or some combination of these programs, you can find more information here.

Mailing List

I’m playing around with a newsletter. It will contain article alerts, special content promotions, and offers exclusive to subscribers. You can sign up here if you’d like. It’s completely free.

I’m teaching two kettlebell classes at Scenic City Strength and Fitness.

An entry-level class that emphasizes the foundations of safe and effective kettlebell training is held Tuesdays at 6:15 pm. It’s only 10 bucks and spots will be limited to ensure a great experience. If you are in the Chattanooga area and have always been curious about trying out kettlebells, it’ll be tough to find a better opportunity.

I also teach a class for folks who are more familiar with kettlebells on Thursdays at the same time. We will dive into some more advanced kettlebell movements and concepts, and push the intensity up a bit more than Tuesday. There will be no class this Thursday, the 26th, because I will be out of town.

You can check out the calendar and register online for any of these classes here. Each class is 10$. Hurry, because the spots fill up fast.

Bullet Points and a Brew 1/17/2017

Winter in the southeast. Schools close due to the cold, yet a week later it’s 70 degrees. Typical. All in all, I had a good weekend. I got some climbing in Sunday and Monday, doing a bunch of moderates I hadn’t tried before. It’s always a good day when new boulders are done.

Bottling day! It's been a while since I've sprayed myself in the eye with beer.

A post shared by Paul Corsaro (@paulcorsaro) on

Saturday, I bottled an Imperial Coffee Stout, so soon my own beer will make a debut on this series. It should be interesting. Let’s get into the bullet points.

The Bullet Points

Landmine exercises aren’t seen super often these days, but they can be super beneficial for overhead loading patterns, training the trunk musculature, and just providing some new stimulus in training. Check out some of these variations.

Motivation is awesome. It’s easy to crush your training session because the psyche is high. What happens when the psyche is low? A great article.

If you want to squat a whole bunch of weight, then the back squat should be your number 1 choice. If you aren’t a powerlifter, you should explore some other varations as well. Different positions and squatting patterns can be beneficial for performance in interesting ways. Here’s Mike Robertson demonstrating some really powerful, and perhaps unconventional ways to squat.

The Brew

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Tart Cherry Wake ‘N Bake, Terrapin Beer Company

The base Wake ‘N Bake is one of my favorite seasonal releases. It’s easy to find here in the southeast, the oatmeal adds some silkiness, the coffee character is strong, and these qualities make it quite the beer. Terrapin came out with a tart cherry version as one of their limited releases. A touch of sour added to one of my favorites? Sign. Me. Up.

The beer pours black with a tan head that fades to a bubbly ring around the glass. A Strong coffee aroma with a slight tang wafts up from the glass. The flavor is more of the same..strong coffee and roasted malts, with a subtle tartness that rides underneath everything. A nice tweak to an great base beer. All the thumbs up.

 


What’s Happening

Nutrition, Performance, and Strength Coaching

It’s the new year, and a lot of people are building out their strategy for training in 2017. I can help. If you’re interested in nutrition coaching, strength training, Functional Movement Screen consulting, performance training, or some combination of these programs, you can find more information here.

Mailing List

I’m playing around with a newsletter. It will contain article alerts, special content promotions, and offers exclusive to subscribers. You can sign up here if you’d like. It’s completely free.

I’m teaching two kettlebell classes at Scenic City Strength and Fitness.

An entry-level class that emphasizes the foundations of safe and effective kettlebell training is held Tuesdays at 6:15 pm. It’s only 10 bucks and spots will be limited to ensure a great experience. If you are in the Chattanooga area and have always been curious about trying out kettlebells, it’ll be tough to find a better opportunity.

I also teach a class for folks who are more familiar with kettlebells on Thursdays at the same time. We will dive into some more advanced kettlebell movements and concepts, and push the intensity up a bit more than Tuesday.

You can check out the calendar and register online for any of these classes here. Each class is 10$. Hurry, because the spots fill up fast.